Curious about the scientific validity of the techniques taught in the SuperLearner® Methodology? Please read our latest scientific publication, created by our resident neuroscientific advisor, Dr. Doran Amos.

THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE SUPERLEARNER METHODOLOGY

The speed reading and memory improvement industries are rife with some pretty big claims.

Triple your reading speed in an hour! Remember anything, instantly! Learn to read 5,000 words per minute while juggling.

Any sensible person would be skeptical of these obviously exaggerated claims.

But who can you trust?

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Memory Improvement

Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory
Martin Dresler, William R. Shirer, Boris N. Konrad, Nils C.J. Müller, Isabella C. Wagner, Guillén Fernández, Michael Czisch, Michael D. Greicius

In this breakthrough study by researchers at Radboud University, scientists studied the brains of accomplished memory champions, and compared them to the brains of everyday people. Then, a subset of the everyday people were trained in the same mnemonic techniques taught by SuperLearner Academy, and tested - both after 4 weeks, and after 6 months. This study yielded a number of key discoveries:

  • Memory champions and world record holders do NOT have a genetic or structural advantage over the rest of us. Their brains start out just like yours.
  • Memory training, however, "upgrades" and rewires your brain, improving its overall function and performance
  • The brains of trained individuals exhibit improved, altered connectivity patterns which dramatically improve recall by over 2X
  • These changes can be achieved in just 30 minutes per day for 4 weeks, and...
  • The improvements are permanent - with benefits persisting even long after you discontinue training

The researchers concluded that “super-sized memory is trainable AND long-lasting.”

Routes to Remembering: The Brains Behind Superior Memory
Eleanor A. Maguire, Elizabeth R. Valentine, John M. Wilding and Narinder Kapur

In this 2002 study conducted by researchers at the University of London and University College London, researchers studied the brains of “average” people against those of world memory champions. Using neuropsychological measures, as well as structural and functional brain imaging, researchers found that superior memory was not driven by exceptional intellectual ability or structural brain differences. Rather, superior memorizers used the same spatial learning strategy taught in the SuperLearner methodology, engaging brain regions such as the hippocampus that are critical for memory and for spatial memory in particular.

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Pre-Reading

The Most Effective Pre-reading Strategies for Comprehension
Jessica Marinaccio

This study at the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education aimed to compare different pre-reading strategies that improve students’ comprehension. This research determined that teachers who activated students’ prior knowledge before reading (as taught in the SuperLearner methodology) enhanced their students’ comprehension.

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Speed Reading

Fast Decoding of Object Information from Intracranial Field Potentials in Human Visual Cortex
Hesheng Liu, Yigal Agam, Joseph R. Madsen, and Gabriel Kreiman

In this 2002 study conducted by researchers at the University of London and University College London, researchers studied the brains of “average” people against those of world memory champions. Using neuropsychological measures, as well as structural and functional brain imaging, researchers found that superior memory was not driven by exceptional intellectual ability or structural brain differences. Rather, superior memorizers used the same spatial learning strategy taught in the SuperLearner methodology, engaging brain regions such as the hippocampus that are critical for memory and for spatial memory in particular.

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Fast Decoding of Object Information from Intracranial Field Potentials in Human Visual Cortex
Hesheng Liu, Yigal Agam, Joseph R. Madsen, and Gabriel Kreiman

In this breakthrough study by Harvard Medical School and the Children’s Hospital of Boston, researchers discovered that our brains are able to process images MUCH faster than we previously anticipated — as in — 100 milliseconds. Extrapolating from the calculations given by the researchers supports a maximal speed of 600 words per minute, without any optical or foveal optimizations such as those taught in the SuperLearner methodology.


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